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Planning and Pressure

In All The Tie Rail, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Years and years of riding horses have taught me that you really only need two things to, as a rider, get your horse to do stuff: (1) a plan and (2) escalation of pressure. What's a plan? A plan is simply setting a goal. Any goal. Deciding on it and going after it—then holding yourself accountable for it, whether you achieve it ...
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Your Seat

In All The Tie Rail, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Updated 9/10/15, Originally Posted 6/4/14 When people refer to "your seat" they're talking about how your butt stays or doesn't stay with the horse when the horse is moving. It's all about rhythm and knowing what rhythm you're trying to stay with. In anything you do on a horse, if you know where and how he's going to get there, ...
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Using Your Voice

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

When working with horses, you have four basic aids: legs, weight, hands, and voice. Of these aids, voice is often overlooked or forgotten—maybe because people are embarrassed or think it sounds silly, or maybe because people just plain forget most of the time. Truth is, a lot people spend much of their time around horses without ever making a sound. And if you think about it, they’re …

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Being Malleable

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

What does it mean to be malleable? Why must we be it? How do we be it? Well let's start at the top and weave our way through. What is malleability? Merriam-Webster defines malleable as: : capable of being stretched or bent into different shapes : capable of being easily changed or influenced In thinking about malleability when working with horses, ...
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On Relationships & Shoveling Poop REPOST

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Caro Garner0 Comments

The following seems fitting after the post Letting Things Take as Much Time as They Need to Take. Think of it as real-world proof that everything takes time. But even more important is what happens after that time has been taken. On Relationships & Shoveling Poop addresses that end—taking your time is worth it. Caro’s relationship with her horse (after time and effort) has become …

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My Approach

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

My Approach is the hardest definition I’ve had to produce yet. The short and sweet is that My Approach is Natural Horsemanship with an emphasis on the school of “I’m open to new ideas.” I wish I could say I believe in whatever works, but when I take a hard look into myself, I have a few beliefs that outweigh this idea. First and foremost, I …