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Planning and Pressure

In All The Tie Rail, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Years and years of riding horses have taught me that you really only need two things to, as a rider, get your horse to do stuff: (1) a plan and (2) escalation of pressure. What's a plan? A plan is simply setting a goal. Any goal. Deciding on it and going after it—then holding yourself accountable for it, whether you achieve it ...
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Approaching and Moving Around a Horse Tied to a Rail

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Navigating horses safely is humongously important, mostly because the consequences of not being safe can be catastrophic. There are two risky areas in particular: (1) when you are approaching a horse and (2) when you are walking behind a horse. Approaching a Horse When approaching a horse, you don't want to scare him. Bad things can happen when horses are scared. Remember: you're talking ...
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Your Seat

In All The Tie Rail, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Updated 9/10/15, Originally Posted 6/4/14 When people refer to "your seat" they're talking about how your butt stays or doesn't stay with the horse when the horse is moving. It's all about rhythm and knowing what rhythm you're trying to stay with. In anything you do on a horse, if you know where and how he's going to get there, ...
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Using Your Voice

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

When working with horses, you have four basic aids: legs, weight, hands, and voice. Of these aids, voice is often overlooked or forgotten—maybe because people are embarrassed or think it sounds silly, or maybe because people just plain forget most of the time. Truth is, a lot people spend much of their time around horses without ever making a sound. And if you think about it, they’re …

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Being Malleable

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Eric Ancker0 Comments

What does it mean to be malleable? Why must we be it? How do we be it? Well let's start at the top and weave our way through. What is malleability? Merriam-Webster defines malleable as: : capable of being stretched or bent into different shapes : capable of being easily changed or influenced In thinking about malleability when working with horses, ...
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Introducing Your Horse to Stuff: Umbrellas

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship by Eric Ancker0 Comments

Along the lines of Letting Things Take as Much Time as They Need to Take are the essentials of desensitizing your horse to crazy scary things—basically anything your horse hasn’t seen or experienced before. Let’s use umbrellas as a starting point for jumping into the wonderful wild world of introducing your horse to the unfamiliar and helping him see them as harmless things that won’t …

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Simple Horse Bridling

In All The Tie Rail, Horsemanship, Tack and Equipment by Eric Ancker1 Comment

Bridling a horse can be pretty painless, but there are a few things you should always keep in mind: Prepare and figure out your bridle before you approach your horse. It’s like homework. Get it done before you go to hand it in. Never bridle a horse while he’s tied to something. If something unexpected happens and the horse pulls …

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On Relationships & Shoveling Poop REPOST

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship, Riding by Caro Garner0 Comments

The following seems fitting after the post Letting Things Take as Much Time as They Need to Take. Think of it as real-world proof that everything takes time. But even more important is what happens after that time has been taken. On Relationships & Shoveling Poop addresses that end—taking your time is worth it. Caro’s relationship with her horse (after time and effort) has become …

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Getting Your Horse’s Head Down

In All The Tie Rail, Ground Work, Horsemanship by Eric Ancker

Horses are prey animals, so they live by the Prey Animal Code of Conduct, of which Article III, section 7.6, subparagraph (iii) reads:  When in doubt, raise your head and snort. If still in doubt after said raising and snorting, run. If someone nearby has already done the raising and snorting, definitely run. If someone near you runs and you ...